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Prescribed Burn at Land Between The Lakes' Franklin Creek Area This Week

Prescribed Burn at Land Between The Lakes' Franklin Creek Area This Week

Weather permitting, Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area will conduct a prescribed burn in the Franklin Creek area during the week of March 27. Franklin Creek burn unit is located east of the Woodlands Trace, north of US68/KY80 and is within the Northern Oak-Grassland Demonstration Area.

Fire management staff will also take advantage of any favorable conditions to continue treatments in open lands near Brandon Springs and Crossroads areas.

"These burns are a continuation of the fire management program at Land Between the Lakes," says Todd Lerke, Fire Management Specialist at Land Between the Lakes. "Prescribed fire is a tool we can use to reduce hazardous fuels, improve forest health, increase diversity, and re-establish fire’s natural role in the forest ecosystem."

The Franklin Creek prescribed burn is 2,641 acres. Prescribed burns only occur if variables including specific weather, fuel conditions, agency guidelines, and protocols are favorable and support desired results.

Smoke will be visible and may have variable short term effects on surrounding communities. The bulk of smoke output will last 2-3 days with each subsequent day sequentially less. Coordination with the National Weather Service, Kentucky Division for Air Quality, predictive services, and on site monitoring will all play an active role in the implementation to minimize potential impacts. Keep windows, doors, and vents closed at night to reduce exposure.

Land Between the Lakes will notify local media outlets on days when prescribed fires are scheduled. Daily updates on prescribed fires can be found at www.landbetweenthelakes.us/alerts-notices or by calling 270.924.2000.

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White Egret
Photo by Melodie Cunningham

Commonly mistaken for a heron, egrets can commonly be seen wading in shallow water near the lakes edge.