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Children's Day on the Farm Coming Up

Children's Day on the Farm Coming Up

A close-up of the mules at the Homeplace 1850s in Land Between The Lakes.

Children’s Day on the Farm is Saturday, May 5, 2018, at the Homeplace 1850s Working Farm in Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area. The annual event runs from 10am to 3pm. Admission is $5 for ages 13 and up, $4 ages 5-12, and free for ages 4 and under.

This year’s theme is “Living Close to the Land.” Children can participate in a variety of hands-on activities to experience life as a child on an 1850s farm.

• 10am-12pm | Butter Churning, Spring Gardening, Splitting Wood, and Toy Time
• 1-3pm | Spinning Yarns, Water Works, Wonder Turners, and Toy Time
• 2:30-3pm | Old-fashioned group games and competitions

A new addition to this year’s event is a spring plowing demonstration with Homeplace mules Dan and Todd from 11am-1pm, weather and soil conditions permitting. Watch the mules in action, meet them up close, and learn about them from the farmers.

"At Children’s Day, young visitors have the opportunity to rediscover and try skills that farm children in the 1850s learned at an early age, from raising your own food to making your own fun,” says Kira Sanscrainte, historic interpreter at the Homeplace.

The Homeplace 1850s Working Farm is located in the Tennessee portion of Land Between the Lakes. Activities are recommended for ages 5 - 12. Home educators will find opportunities to engage children through play.

Fourth grade students can go to https://everykidinapark.gov/, get their free Every Kid in a Park pass, and get their family in for free. For more information, call the Nature Station at 270.924.2299.

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The Homeplace
Photo by Connie Wilson

The Homeplace 1850's working farm is one of the most visited tourist attractions in the Land Between The Lakes. Events are scheduled year-round to remind visitors of how the residents of this region once lived.